Month: March 2013

Record Number of Gun Permits Issued by Minnesota Sheriffs in 2012

County Sheriffs in Minnesota issued a record number of permits to carry firearms in 2012.

According to the state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, 31,657 permits were granted last year. That’s up from 20,772 in 2011. Overall in 2012, 285 applications were denied, although not all of the permits have been processed.

Twin Cities-area counties issued the most permits in 2012:

  • Hennepin: 4,761
  • Anoka: 2,554
  • Dakota: 2,501
  • Washington: 1,947
  • Ramsey: 1,850

Here are some more facts from a report in the StarTribune:

Under Minnesota’s “shall issue” law, passed in 2003 as part of a national campaign by the National Rifle Association, applicants are presumed to have a right to carry a weapon unless sheriffs can document disqualifying reasons. Since then, about 96 percent of gun-carry permit applications have been approved.

When individuals apply for a permit with their local sheriff’s office, they must provide proof of approved firearms training. Sheriffs then follow a legally defined process, checking FBI, BCA and Department of Human Services records as well as their own data for information that might prompt a denial. Individuals can appeal a denial.

Minnesota’s permit holders have committed at least 1,159 crimes since 2003, including 114 in which a gun was used, according to the BCA.

If you have a legal issue, please contact me and I may help you sort through the facts and help you understand your rights. Call the Flanagan Law Office in Hugo, Minnesota for representation at (651) 200-3484.

Getting into University with a Criminal Record

Most Minnesota High School Students have already sent off their College or University applications and are eagerly awaiting their acceptance letters before heading off for Spring Break. Other students may be concerned about their pasts clouding their future success.

Here’s some tips for applicants with criminal records applying for higher education:

  1. Review each College’s application before applying. Not all schools will ask for your criminal history.
  2. Do your research. Your criminal record may not prevent you from being accepted to a University but it may limit your ability to pay for classes. Some charges do not allow you to receive Federal student loans. Other loan options should still be available, but be sure you know what’s available.
  3. If the school you are applying to asks for a criminal history, BE HONEST! Lying will likely send a rejection letter directly to your mailbox.
  4. Write a personal statement about your experience. Try to explain who you are now and how you’ve changed since you were convicted of a crime.

You can also look into getting your criminal record expunged. Here are some basics provided by the State of Minnesota.

If you have a legal issue, please contact me and I may help you sort through the facts and help you understand your rights. Call the Flanagan Law Office in Hugo, Minnesota for representation at (651) 200-3484.